Browse Prior Art Database

Nonimpact Printing Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078662D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Damm, EP: AUTHOR

Abstract

The figure illustrates in a highly schematic form a method of printing capable of high speeds, which utilizes the phenomena of liquid attraction by electric fields. It is generally well known in the nonimpact printing arts, that liquids can be attracted in the shape of electric fields to produce printed characters. In the past it has been necessary to use relatively large electrical voltages in order to attract the ink from an ink carrying member, such as a roller, onto the surface to be printed. This has been so due to the fact that such systems have utilized more or less conventional inking rollers, wherein the ink is highly attracted to the roller surface.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Nonimpact Printing Method

The figure illustrates in a highly schematic form a method of printing capable of high speeds, which utilizes the phenomena of liquid attraction by electric fields. It is generally well known in the nonimpact printing arts, that liquids can be attracted in the shape of electric fields to produce printed characters. In the past it has been necessary to use relatively large electrical voltages in order to attract the ink from an ink carrying member, such as a roller, onto the surface to be printed. This has been so due to the fact that such systems have utilized more or less conventional inking rollers, wherein the ink is highly attracted to the roller surface.

By the present method an inherently nonwettable inking member is utilized to carry the liquid ink to the printing station. Referring to the figure, a metal belt coated with TEFLON* or radiated polyethylene 1 is shown located on driver rollers 2. An inking station 3 sprays the ink in finely dispersed form on the nonwettable surface at a point relatively close to the printing station, to minimize conglomeration of the ink on the surface. A suitable record receiving paper 4 is passed in close proximity to the inking roller and the write head 5, which would conventionally be a matrix, is located on the opposite side of the paper from the inking roller, and suitable electric signals are applied to attract the ink droplets to the paper by electrostatic attraction.

In the preferred embodim...