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Forming Metallized Patterns on Ceramic Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078663D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Damm, EP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate a method for laying down conductive patterns on ceramic substrates in a continuous process. The method eliminates all masks and is compatible with other forming techniques currently being used in industry.

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Forming Metallized Patterns on Ceramic Substrates

Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate a method for laying down conductive patterns on ceramic substrates in a continuous process. The method eliminates all masks and is compatible with other forming techniques currently being used in industry.

An electrostatic ink jet printing system is illustrated; however, other printing systems utilizing, for example, electromagnetic deflection of the ink droplet stream, "oil can" printing techniques, etc. would be suitable for the process. Printing speeds in excess of 100 inches per sec are considered feasible.

The method comprises utilizing a green sheet ceramic in continuous form, passing in front of the ink jet printing station by suitable drive rollers. The ink utilized is chosen to contain a compound which is decomposable to a conductive material. This might be done through heating, chemical reaction, etching, etc. If sufficient heating is available, the ink could simply contain a colloidal suspension of an appropriate conductor. The various circuit patterns for a multilayer ceramic could be printed across the green sheet for subsequent slicing. Input data determining the shape of the pattern is applied as input data to the charging signal circuitry which, as will be understood, controls the actual pattern printed on the record receiving member.

The advantages of the process include the elimination of masks, and also the provision of great versatility in that the particular pattern la...