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Fabricating Uniform Multinozzles for Ink Jet Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078665D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hochberg, F: AUTHOR

Abstract

The method comprises essentially five steps, each of which is clearly illustrated in Figs. 1-5. The first step comprises drilling holes in the substrate. The second step comprises placing wires in the holes, wherein the wire is substantially smaller than the hole diameter. The wire size will ultimately determine the final nozzle bore. A mandrel, as shown in Fig. 2, would preferably be used for proper alignment of the wires. Next, the assembly is placed in a plating, chemical vapor deposition, etc. area, wherein a coating is formed on the surface of the substrate around the wires and within the holes to completely surround the wire and fill the holes. Next, the assembly is removed from the plating area and the top and back side are polished, to expose the wires of the nozzle.

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Fabricating Uniform Multinozzles for Ink Jet Printing

The method comprises essentially five steps, each of which is clearly illustrated in Figs. 1-5. The first step comprises drilling holes in the substrate. The second step comprises placing wires in the holes, wherein the wire is substantially smaller than the hole diameter. The wire size will ultimately determine the final nozzle bore. A mandrel, as shown in Fig. 2, would preferably be used for proper alignment of the wires. Next, the assembly is placed in a plating, chemical vapor deposition, etc. area, wherein a coating is formed on the surface of the substrate around the wires and within the holes to completely surround the wire and fill the holes. Next, the assembly is removed from the plating area and the top and back side are polished, to expose the wires of the nozzle. The final step comprises etching the wire from inside the nozzle. Concurrently with the etching operation, further machining can be done to provide a more desirable shape for the nozzle as illustrated in Fig. 5.

Many different techniques can be utilized for drilling the hole such as electron beam machining, laser drilling, etc., together with photoresist and plating techniques to achieve arrays of miniature nozzles.

A further extension of the present method is exempliiied in Fig. 6, which illustrates a method for shaping a group of nozzles to, for example, allow for color printing wherein the three primary colors are arranged in groups. Pr...