Browse Prior Art Database

Natural Selection Program Having a Supply and Demand Scoring Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078695D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dunham, B: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This is an improvement to an automatic process for assigning a plurality of interconnected electrical circuits to positions on a module or chip structure. An exemplary automatic process is disclosed in the publication entitled "Design by Natural Selection" by B. Dunham et al, June, 1961, RC#476 available from IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York.

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Natural Selection Program Having a Supply and Demand Scoring Mechanism

This is an improvement to an automatic process for assigning a plurality of interconnected electrical circuits to positions on a module or chip structure. An exemplary automatic process is disclosed in the publication entitled "Design by Natural Selection" by B. Dunham et al, June, 1961, RC#476 available from IBM
T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York.

In the general use of a natural selection program, it sometimes occurs that the resulting module contains regions of high density. That is, certain regions of the module will have circuits closely nested together, as a result of an optimization process that was based on a given scoring mechanism. While the resulting layout provided by the natural selection program may represent an optimized score, it may present difficulties in that the circuit elements, as positioned, are not capable of being wired or interconnected.

The improvement described herein improves the distribution of circuit elements on the module so as to minimize high-density regions. The objective is to minimize line length of the interconnected circuits, but nevertheless to take advantage of sparsely filled regions of the module. This will permit interconnection of circuits of the very dense regions. Given a specific scoring mechanism, the natural selection program is executed with each unit of space of the module being given equal weight. After an allocation ha...