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Magnetic Bubble Domain Code Converter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078700D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hayashi, N: AUTHOR

Abstract

A magnetic bubble domain alphanumeric display system is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 15, No. 7, December 1972, pages 2213-2216, entitled "Magnetic Bubble Domain Alphanumeric Display and Microfilm Printing Device", by H. Chang and N. Hayashi. In the present description, a bubble domain code converter is presented which can be utilized in the aforementioned alphanumeric display.

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Magnetic Bubble Domain Code Converter

A magnetic bubble domain alphanumeric display system is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 15, No. 7, December 1972, pages 2213- 2216, entitled "Magnetic Bubble Domain Alphanumeric Display and Microfilm Printing Device", by H. Chang and N. Hayashi. In the present description, a bubble domain code converter is presented which can be utilized in the aforementioned alphanumeric display.

The code converter is a decoder which utilizes compact code domains to close or open gates between output ports of a picture code memory and a display area, thereby selecting a channel for picture code domain propagation. This basic system is shown in Fig. 1 and in the aforementioned IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin article.

Fig. 2 shows a logical structure for a bubble domain code converter. The principle of operation is similar to that of conventional bubble domain decoders (such as is shown in U. S. Patent 3,701,125), except, that magnetostatic interaction between domains is used for domain propagation, rather that current loops. In more detail, the bold lines in Fig. 2 represent propagation channels in which current loops are used to expand domains from the compact code memory. The single circles represent sources for initial bubble domains and utilize permalloy overlay patterns, as is well known. The symbols using double circles with empty and filled inner circles, represents normally open gates and normally closed gates with holding capability, respectively.

A normally open gate is shown in Fig. 3A, while a normally closed gate is shown in Fig. 3B. Operations of these gates is shown in Figs. 4A and 4B, respectively.

The normally open gate placed at an intersection (x(i), p(j)) permits a domain in the picture code channel p(j). to run out to reach the output port of the converter, only if there is no domain in the compact code chann...