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High Frequency Shaping of Electron Beams for Microcircuit Fabrication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078740D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Broers, AN: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This description relates to an electron-beam tube system for use in microcircuit fabrication. The primary concept is to "shape" the electron beam using high-frequency deflection so that the electron beam, when under the control of the pattern generator, never has to "paint" in resist areas larger than the minimum dimension in the particular pattern being exposed. The deflection is carried out at frequencies which are high compared with the control system speed. For example, a round-beam system could be scanned into a square configuration.

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High Frequency Shaping of Electron Beams for Microcircuit Fabrication

This description relates to an electron-beam tube system for use in microcircuit fabrication. The primary concept is to "shape" the electron beam using high-frequency deflection so that the electron beam, when under the control of the pattern generator, never has to "paint" in resist areas larger than the minimum dimension in the particular pattern being exposed. The deflection is carried out at frequencies which are high compared with the control system speed. For example, a round-beam system could be scanned into a square configuration.

Two approaches have been used to write patterns with scanning type electron-beam fabrication systems. The first is where a round-electron beam is used to define the pattern. The beam is four to five times smaller than the smallest dimension found in any needed pattern, so that the required dimensional and positional tolerances can be met. The beam is scanned so that all required areas are "painted" in. If a raster-scanning technique is used, the beam must be scanned with a line spacing four to five times smaller than the smallest pattern dimension.

The second approach is where a shaped beam is used which has the dimensions of the smallest element found in any of the desired patterns, and has its edges defined in the order of one-fourth to one-fifth of the smallest dimension.

The speed at which each beam position has to be described by the pattern control system, is sixteen to twenty-five...