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Metallurgy for Glass/Metal Layers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078759D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chance, DA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This metal system offers improvements over a chrome-copper system for use on a glass-metal interconnection package, in that it is less oxidizable than the chrome system, and yet provides good adhesion to both ceramic and glass. Also the materials of this system do not deleteriously interact from a metallurgical standpoint, but yet are good electrical conductors. Furthermore, the ambient gaseous systems normally employed for glass densification do not oxidize the metals of this system. Finally, the low coefficient of expansion and close thermal match of molybdenum to glass offers the existence of a metallized surface, upon which thick layers of gold can be readily deposited and used for bonding without glass cracking and loss of adhesion.

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Metallurgy for Glass/Metal Layers

This metal system offers improvements over a chrome-copper system for use on a glass-metal interconnection package, in that it is less oxidizable than the chrome system, and yet provides good adhesion to both ceramic and glass. Also the materials of this system do not deleteriously interact from a metallurgical standpoint, but yet are good electrical conductors. Furthermore, the ambient gaseous systems normally employed for glass densification do not oxidize the metals of this system. Finally, the low coefficient of expansion and close thermal match of molybdenum to glass offers the existence of a metallized surface, upon which thick layers of gold can be readily deposited and used for bonding without glass cracking and loss of adhesion.

Fig. 1 illustrates the internal layers of a multilevel interconnection package, employing either a glass or a ceramic body. Fig. 1 shows internal layers wherein the conductive metallurgy is sandwiched between an upper body comprising a ceramic or glass body 10, in which is formed a copper via stud 12. The bottom layer comprises a glass or ceramic body 14 in which there is also formed a copper via stud 16. The sandwich metallurgy comprises a 5,000 Angstrom thick molybdenum layer 18, a 200 Angstrom thick cobalt (CO) metal layer 20, and a copper line or plane 22 having a thickness of 80,000 Angstroms. Interposed between the copper line or plane 22, is a duplication of the materials and dimensions of...