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Delay Line Oscillator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078801D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jeremiah, TL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The oscillator 1 shown in the drawing provides clock pulses for any desired period of time, using a time delay equal to approximately one-half the basic oscillator period. Normally, if a delay-line clock is used to provide timing pulses, the length of the delay line must be about equal to the length of the process being timed. Since delay lines are relatively bulky and expensive when compared to logic circuit modules, this approach is often undesirable. The length of the required delay line can be reduced by recirculating the timing pulse. That is, the pulse is taken from the delay-line output and returned to the input. Logic circuits keep count of how many times the pulse is recirculated.

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Delay Line Oscillator

The oscillator 1 shown in the drawing provides clock pulses for any desired period of time, using a time delay equal to approximately one-half the basic oscillator period. Normally, if a delay-line clock is used to provide timing pulses, the length of the delay line must be about equal to the length of the process being timed. Since delay lines are relatively bulky and expensive when compared to logic circuit modules, this approach is often undesirable. The length of the required delay line can be reduced by recirculating the timing pulse. That is, the pulse is taken from the delay-line output and returned to the input. Logic circuits keep count of how many times the pulse is recirculated. This design, however, still requires a relatively long delay line, and any pulse-width changes caused by delay-line characteristics will be amplified each time the pulse is recirculated.

The illustrated delay-line oscillator has the following advantages:
1) The length of time delay required is only about one-half

the length of the oscillator period.
2) The pulse may recirculate as many times as desired without

any change in width.
3) Only one external signal is required to initiate the

clocking process. This is a definite advantage where

paths of communication with outside circuitry are limited.

The oscillator includes a latch 1 with its in-phase feedback output A being coupled to a first time delay element T1. The output C of T1 is coupled to the input of 1 by way of an inverter 3, to a...