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Planar Beam Steering Bulk Acoustic Wave Transducer for High Resolution Laser Beam Deflection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078882D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kuhn, L: AUTHOR

Abstract

Efficient, high-resolution, acoustooptic deflectors require the use of acoustic beam steering techniques, in order to satisfy Bragg conditions over a wide range of deflection angle. Described is a beam steering bulk acoustic wave transducer which is fabricated using planar techniques, and radiates most of its energy into a single steerable radiation lobe. The transducer consists of a periodic array of N sections, each containing n bulk acoustic wave transducers, driven from n separate phase lines as shown in Fig. 1. Heretofore, it has been generally thought that a stepped transducer, which is extremely difficult to fabricate, was the only way to confine the acoustic energy primarily into a single steerable lobe.

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Planar Beam Steering Bulk Acoustic Wave Transducer for High Resolution Laser Beam Deflection

Efficient, high-resolution, acoustooptic deflectors require the use of acoustic beam steering techniques, in order to satisfy Bragg conditions over a wide range of deflection angle. Described is a beam steering bulk acoustic wave transducer which is fabricated using planar techniques, and radiates most of its energy into a single steerable radiation lobe. The transducer consists of a periodic array of N sections, each containing n bulk acoustic wave transducers, driven from n separate phase lines as shown in Fig. 1. Heretofore, it has been generally thought that a stepped transducer, which is extremely difficult to fabricate, was the only way to confine the acoustic energy primarily into a single steerable lobe.

The transducer array, as shown in Fig. 1, is formed by standard planar techniques used for integrated circuits on a film or thin slab of piezoelectric material on the end of the delay line. The cross section of a 4-phase device is shown in Fig. 2.

Each element of the array radiates primarily in the forward direction. The radiation pattern from the entire array will have the pattern for a single element as its envelope. Each n-phase element of the array, if driven with phase difference Delta Phi=2 Pi/n arts as a "source wave", propagating approximately perpendicular to the acoustic axis with a velocity V(s) given by 2 Pi fd/Delta Phi = nfd. This "wave" will radiate...