Browse Prior Art Database

Measurement of Small Angles with a Microscope

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078893D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Deines, JL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This apparatus permits the use of any laboratory microscope for the measurement of small angles.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

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Measurement of Small Angles with a Microscope

This apparatus permits the use of any laboratory microscope for the measurement of small angles.

The operating principle of the apparatus is that if a line, wire or vehicle is placed across or within a long working distance objective lens of a microscope, a line image is protected below. A yield two images; one reflected off each of the flat and beveled surfaces. Rotation of the beveled sample causes a rotation of the line images, each one about its own axis of rotation. The images can thus be made to separate or overlap. The separation distance S is related to the angle of rotation , and the sample angle 0 can be calculated from the relation . 0 = S over 2nd sin, where d is the distance from the line image source to the sample bevel edge. Since the bevel angle 0 is inversely proportional to the sine of the rotation angle , the measurement of the increasing rotation angle becomes easier and more accurate as the bevel angle becomes smaller. Normal operation of the microscope is in no way destructed by this apparatus. The microscope objective lens has such a short depth of field that the line image source within the lens assembly is completely invisible, when the microscope is used in the normal manner.

As illustrated, the apparatus consists of two basic sections. The line image source can be made in several ways. A wire 10 or glass disc 10a with an imprinted line can be placed within the lens assembly 8. Alternately, a...