Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Two Dimensional Optical Display using Charge Transfer Electronics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078907D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DiStefano, TH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A display, utilizing charge transfer on a Ga(x)Al(1-x) As wafer surface with controlled recombination of the charge is proposed to produce luminescence. Location of the light pulses coincides with the positions of the charge pockets prior to the recombination.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Two Dimensional Optical Display using Charge Transfer Electronics

A display, utilizing charge transfer on a Ga(x)Al(1-x) As wafer surface with controlled recombination of the charge is proposed to produce luminescence. Location of the light pulses coincides with the positions of the charge pockets prior to the recombination.

With the advent of buried conduction channels on semiconductor surfaces, it has become possible to use metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) techniques in materials other than silicon. In particular, one can move surface charge on a direct gap semi-conductor such as Ga(x)Al(1-x) As. After the surface charge has been moved into the desired two-dimensional configuration on the surface of the material, it can be injected into the bulk of the semiconductor where it will produce luminescence. Thus, by using charge transfer techniques, a two- dimensional pattern of charge can be formed and then converted into a corresponding pattern of light output.

The device is illustrated in Fig. 1. Semiconductor material 10, made of Ga(x)Al(1-x)As, is provided with channel regions 12, an overlay of insulating material 14 such as SiO(2), and spaced electrodes 16 on the insulating material. Pulse sources V01, V02 and V03 are connected to different successive electrodes 16 to provide a three-phase system. During operation of the phi 1 and phi 2 voltage pulses, electronic surface charge is moved along the surface either to the left or right of material 10 depending upon...