Browse Prior Art Database

Wrist Worn Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078921D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ludeman, CP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The data terminal including a display, keyboard, communications coupler, memory and power supply may be incorporated into a suitable package and strapped to the wrist of a person for varied uses and applications. Included among these applications are off-line calculators and precision electronic wrist watches.

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Wrist Worn Terminal

The data terminal including a display, keyboard, communications coupler, memory and power supply may be incorporated into a suitable package and strapped to the wrist of a person for varied uses and applications. Included among these applications are off-line calculators and precision electronic wrist watches.

The figure shows the terminal 10 including a suitable package for incorporating a display 12 and keyboard 14. The package may be of metal or plastic and of a configuration which is comfortable to a person when strapped to his wrist. The display 12 may be a fixed format reflective liquid crystal or one having a horizontal/ vertical scan capability. The latter permits the display information to be more readily varied.

A stylus operated keyboard permits data to be entered into the terminal. This keyboard may be of the type utilizing a conductive elastomer. A mechanical stylus, not shown, is inserted into an opening 16 of the package to press the elastomer. When pressed, the elastomer completes electrical circuitry, not shown, which originates unique signals descriptive of the character at each key position. As an alternative, an optical keyboard may be substituted for the conductive elastomer. The publication entitled "Miniature Optical Keyboard" by
C. P. Ludeman, appearing in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 15, No. 11, April 1973, pages 3348 & 3349, shows a substitute keyboard. As a further alternative, a permanent magnet elastomer sheet may be deformed to actuate a Hall or similar magnetically sensitive device under each key position. A publication entitled "Hall Effect Keyboard Including Magnetic Keeper" by C. P. Ludeman, which appeared in the IBM Technical Disclosure...