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Integrated Resistor Contacts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078940D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dorler, JA: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

In the past, Fig. 1, the use of a low-resistivity diffusion 1 as a conducting media was restrictive due to inherent limiting factors, such as pipe sensitivity and the required use of "shorting - tabs" 2 used to complete voltage distribution.

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Integrated Resistor Contacts

In the past, Fig. 1, the use of a low-resistivity diffusion 1 as a conducting media was restrictive due to inherent limiting factors, such as pipe sensitivity and the required use of "shorting - tabs" 2 used to complete voltage distribution.

In Fig. 2, an integrated resistor contact is shown. A low-resistivity diffusion 10 is used to define one or both ends of a diffused resistor 12, thereby excluding the necessity of using the typical "mechanical" resistor contact 13. The resistor length, 1, is defined by the region between the resistor contact 13 and the diffusion interface 14. Typically, only one uncritical bias contact 15 is made to region 10. This technique can easily be modified for N-type resistors.

The advantages of this technique are enhanced, in bifurcated resistor structures, i.e., as the number of resistors 12 are commoned to the low-resistivity element 10. Other advantages included are higher reliability as a result of fewer "mechanical" resistor contacts 13, improved integrated circuit wireability by the elimination of obstructive resistor surface contacts, and reduced resistor sensitivity to contact resistance and end effects phenomenon.

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