Browse Prior Art Database

Full Wave Rectifier and Regulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000078990D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gerbitz, CG: AUTHOR

Abstract

This circuit will convert an AC input voltage to a DC output voltage, regulateable between zero and the peak-to-peak voltage of the input. When operated in nonregulating, full-output mode, it constitutes a full-wave voltage doubler circuit.

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Full Wave Rectifier and Regulator

This circuit will convert an AC input voltage to a DC output voltage, regulateable between zero and the peak-to-peak voltage of the input. When operated in nonregulating, full-output mode, it constitutes a full-wave voltage doubler circuit.

The circuit charges C1 through D4 during positive transients 1 of A and transfers charge from C1 to C3 via Q1, during negative going transients II of A with respect to B. Similarly, the circuit charges C2 during negative transients III of A and transfers charge from C2 to C3 via Q2, during positive going transients IV of A with respect to B. Control 10 senses the voltage across C3 via lines 12, 14 and operates via lines 16, 18 to shut off conduction of Q1 and Q2 for obtaining the regulating function. Q1 and Q2 are suitable switches such as gate turn-off thyristors. Alternatively, the circuit can be implemented with other control elements such as transistors or, if no regulation is desired, Q1 and Q2 can be simple diodes.

Assume that initially all voltages are zero. Then, as A goes positive with respect to B, C1 is charged during time period 1 to voltage E from the line via path 1 through D4. When point X in the input A-B is reached and C1 has attained its maximum charge, time period 11 commences. As the voltage A-B starts to decrease, Q1 conducts and C1 will discharge via path 11 through Q1, C3 and D3. As a result, C3 will become charged to an initial voltage, which is a function of the capaci...