Browse Prior Art Database

Electroforming a Profile Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079002D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bement, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method eliminates time-consuming and expensive form grinding by using a large, inexpensive template, an engraving machine, and an EDM (electrical discharge machining) machine to form a profile cutting tool. This tool may be used, for example, in a lathe or as a fly cutter to produce part 7. By the use of this method, an initial error of, for example, 0.0001 inch in the large 10-to-1 template appears as an error of only 0.00001 inch in the cutting tool.

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Electroforming a Profile Tool

This method eliminates time-consuming and expensive form grinding by using a large, inexpensive template, an engraving machine, and an EDM (electrical discharge machining) machine to form a profile cutting tool. This tool may be used, for example, in a lathe or as a fly cutter to produce part 7. By the use of this method, an initial error of, for example, 0.0001 inch in the large 10-to- 1 template appears as an error of only 0.00001 inch in the cutting tool.

A template 1, having a surface 2 defining the desired tool shape, is made from a flat piece of sheet metal or thin, rigid plastic. This template is preferably quite large, for example ten times larger than the size of the cutting tool shape.

The template is then mounted on an-engraving machine and a 10-to-1 reducing mechanism is used to trace the template, while engraving an EDM electrode 3 to the actual tool shape. Electrode surface 4 is identical to surface 2 with a size reduction of 10.

The EDM electrode 3 is then mounted in an EDM machine and the shape of its surface 4 is burned into a carbide or a high-speed-steel tool bit 5, leaving the desired shape in the tapered cutting surface 6 of the profile cutting tool.

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