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Tubular Armature Internal Ceramic Magnet Electromotive Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079003D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Guzman, AM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This direct-current, permanent-magnet motor achieves low-response time by means of ceramic permanent magnets mounted within the motor's tubular armature. The ceramic magnets serve two functions. Namely, they supply the necessary magnetic field, and the high-magnetic reluctance/high-electrical resistance characteristic of the ceramic material insures that the armature's coil will surround a low-loss material. As a result the coil current builds up rapidly, and low-response time results.

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Tubular Armature Internal Ceramic Magnet Electromotive Machine

This direct-current, permanent-magnet motor achieves low-response time by means of ceramic permanent magnets mounted within the motor's tubular armature. The ceramic magnets serve two functions. Namely, they supply the necessary magnetic field, and the high-magnetic reluctance/high-electrical resistance characteristic of the ceramic material insures that the armature's coil will surround a low-loss material. As a result the coil current builds up rapidly, and low-response time results.

Figs. 1 and 2 show a rotary motor having a four-magnet cluster 10, 11, 12 and 13 mounted on a central rod 14 of low-carbon steel. These magnets are sector-shaped in cross section, as seen in Fig. 2, and are radially magnetized. This radial magnetization, and the sector shape, presents a diverging magnetic field to the armature's annular air gap. The magnets have their short arc dimension facing the rod and their long arc dimension facing armature 9, to define the annular air gap.

Rod 14 is supported by nonmagnetic end plate 15. The armature 9 is supported for rotation by shaft 16. Shaft 16 is rotationally supported in plate 15 and in nonmagnetic end plate 17, by bearings 18 and 19. A number of brushes 20 are mounted in tubular flux return path member 21 and supply electrical energy to the armature.

Fig. 3 shows an axial section view of a linear motor, whose armature 22 is movable along a line, as shown by arrow 23. The...