Browse Prior Art Database

Variable Read Keyboard

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079076D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gelb, JP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The illustrated typing keyboard has changeable (programmable) type font or other selection function indicators associated with individual keys. Optical images are transferred from a film (or microfilm) to discrete viewing apertures or screens on (or adjacent) individual keys via coherent fiber-optic bundles. The film is carried on a drum or other mechanically displaceable film carrier. A simple slide at the base of the keyboard is used to vary the position of the film carrier, and thereby vary the light indications transferred to the key viewing screens. The selection of type font or function may thus be modified, either manually or under program control via computer coupling.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Variable Read Keyboard

The illustrated typing keyboard has changeable (programmable) type font or other selection function indicators associated with individual keys. Optical images are transferred from a film (or microfilm) to discrete viewing apertures or screens on (or adjacent) individual keys via coherent fiber-optic bundles. The film is carried on a drum or other mechanically displaceable film carrier.

A simple slide at the base of the keyboard is used to vary the position of the film carrier, and thereby vary the light indications transferred to the key viewing screens. The selection of type font or function may thus be modified, either manually or under program control via computer coupling.

The film may be illuminated either in its entirety by a broadly dispersed incoherent light source, or raster scanned by a spot-focused beam at a "nonflickering" rate (e.g., 30 'frames' per second). The film may be a hologram scanned by a deflected beam of low-energy laser illumination.

In a raster printing system, the projected images may be split before transmission through the fibers and the split portion used to control printing.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]