Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard/Display System With Discrete Electrically Variable Function Indicia for Individual Keys

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079077D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gelb, JP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A portion (or all) of a cathode-ray tube (CRT) display screen surface interfaces through coherent fiber-optic bundles, with discrete display areas adjacent (or on) keys of a panel or keyboard. Thus, electronically variable (programmable) indications presented on the interfacing CRT screen surface are discretely presented for viewing at individual keys. This type of arrangement is especially useful for Interactive terminal systems; e.g., terminals for computer assisted instruction. The images presented at the keys may be text characters, pictures, and/or graphics. By presenting the selection indications at associated keys, the possibility of wrong key operation due to lack of coordination between eye and hand or ambiguous labelling is lessened.

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Keyboard/Display System With Discrete Electrically Variable Function Indicia for Individual Keys

A portion (or all) of a cathode-ray tube (CRT) display screen surface interfaces through coherent fiber-optic bundles, with discrete display areas adjacent (or on) keys of a panel or keyboard. Thus, electronically variable (programmable) indications presented on the interfacing CRT screen surface are discretely presented for viewing at individual keys. This type of arrangement is especially useful for Interactive terminal systems; e.g., terminals for computer assisted instruction. The images presented at the keys may be text characters, pictures, and/or graphics. By presenting the selection indications at associated keys, the possibility of wrong key operation due to lack of coordination between eye and hand or ambiguous labelling is lessened.

The indication electronics may be adapted to cause individual key messages to blink with specific frequency, or change color as an additional signal to the key operator.

A small CRT with magnifying optics between the CRT face and fiber optics may be used, where CRT space and/or cost is at a premium. In addition, a single CRT display may be adapted to use multiple keyboards, each interfacing through fiber optics with discrete portions of the screen.

If privacy is desired, the images formed on the CRT may be arranged in a scrambled unintelligible configuration, and the fiber-optics bundles may be modularly configured for insertion...