Browse Prior Art Database

Display Syntax Control for Interactive Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079078D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Richards, JE: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a man-machine interactive system (e.g., cathode-ray tube (CRT) display with light pen), the syntax of selection options presented to the human operator may be dynamically constrained so as to preclude erroneous selection. As indicated in the flow diagram, the user selections (by CRT light pen, keyboard operations, etc.) initiate program examination of the decision table or other intelligence affecting the selection indications next presented as CRT (or other) indications to the user. By limiting the presented (and selectable) indications only to relevant items of a set, including relevant and nonrelevant choices, the possibility of erroneous selection is reduced.

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Display Syntax Control for Interactive Systems

In a man-machine interactive system (e.g., cathode-ray tube (CRT) display with light pen), the syntax of selection options presented to the human operator may be dynamically constrained so as to preclude erroneous selection. As indicated in the flow diagram, the user selections (by CRT light pen, keyboard operations, etc.) initiate program examination of the decision table or other intelligence affecting the selection indications next presented as CRT (or other) indications to the user. By limiting the presented (and selectable) indications only to relevant items of a set, including relevant and nonrelevant choices, the possibility of erroneous selection is reduced.

For example, if the selection set would be the signed integers between -10 and +10, and the circumstance requires selection of a positive value, the sign choice indication is suppressed and the sign is effectively "understood" by the program.

Another example of the dynamic menu principle is shown in the accompanying scenario drawing, illustrating numerical entry to a computer. A decision table may be used to describe the logic for presenting the selection indicia (dynamic menu items) to the operator.

It is not necessary that there be a hierarchical transactional structure in the interactive sequence, although it might be argued that any procedural format (e.g., the syntax of a language) could be described in terms of a hierarchy of permissible transaction...