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Phase Trace Method for Measuring Real Time Usage of Programming Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079088D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hasch, AL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The Phase Trace (PHTR) components are categorized in two groups. The first group is involved in collecting and maintaining the data concerning the Disk Operating System (DOS) supervisor's fetching activities. The second group is concerned with saving the collected data on a permanent basis and preparing various reports based on analysis (ANAL) of this data.

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Phase Trace Method for Measuring Real Time Usage of Programming Components

The Phase Trace (PHTR) components are categorized in two groups. The first group is involved in collecting and maintaining the data concerning the Disk Operating System (DOS) supervisor's fetching activities. The second group is concerned with saving the collected data on a permanent basis and preparing various reports based on analysis (ANAL) of this data.

The programs In the first group, once initialized, run continuously along with the DOS supervisor. Their functions are not affected by Initial Program Loading (IPLing) or changing the Interval Timer. They function in a real-time environment, along with the DOS supervisor and the user's problem programs with minimal interference. The collected data is continually accumulated in the disk area, usually for extended periods of time, possibly a week or month, before the merged records are subsequently put on the history tape.

The flow of the first group of programs is:
1. The resident trace is initialized via IPLing and dynamically

setting "hooks" into

strategic locations in the DOS supervisor. The

resident trace monitors the supervisor's fetching

activity and saves pertinent

information in its phase table. The data collected

concerns identification, times and usage. The phase

table is maintained in a manner

to eliminate any duplicate entries for a given

phase.
2. The data in the phase table is written in the disk area (as

unmerged records) at one of two points in time:

a) Between job steps or at end of job; this is done

even if the table is not full

so that as much work as possible can be done

between steps, and

b) On a phase table full condition this is done only as

required to minimize interference with the user's

programs.
3. As previously described, at the end of a job step, the DOS

supervisor calls the program.
4. The following activity is done at that time:

a) The B-transient checks that the interval timer is on;

then passes the

phase table while simultaneously zeroing the phase

table.

b) The time intervals for all "...