Browse Prior Art Database

Programmable Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079117D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stuebner, FE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The drawing shows apparatus for testing a logic or storage circuit card 2 that may have various characteristics and require a variety of test conditions. For example, different cards require different voltage levels, basic clock rates, and timing pulses for operation and they may further require various data patterns for the test. The conditions for testing a particular circuit card are entered on a data card 3 and loaded into a data store 4. Store 4 may be the data store commonly provided for card-data recorders.

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Programmable Tester

The drawing shows apparatus for testing a logic or storage circuit card 2 that may have various characteristics and require a variety of test conditions. For example, different cards require different voltage levels, basic clock rates, and timing pulses for operation and they may further require various data patterns for the test. The conditions for testing a particular circuit card are entered on a data card 3 and loaded into a data store 4. Store 4 may be the data store commonly provided for card-data recorders.

A tester 5 is connected to card 2 by a system of conductors 6 that carry timing and data signals to the card, and carry data signals from the card that are to be compared with the signals expected as a result of a test. Tester 3 has registers 8, 9 and 10 that receive entries from store 4 on a system of conductors
11. Registers, not shown in the drawing, hold control words for selecting an appropriate power supply and for providing selected data- test patterns to card 2.

Register 8 holds an eleven-bit word that defines the basic clock timing. An oscillator 12 operates at a multiple of the usual clock frequency, and a seven-hit position counter 13 is advanced according to the output of the oscillator. Seven bits of the clock frequency defining word in register 8 are applied to a compare circuit 14, that also receives a seven-bit input from counter 13 and produces a signal at the multiple of the clock frequency that is defined by the seven bits. Four oth...