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Browse Prior Art Database

Product Fill Control Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079130D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Capell, HJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Accurate weights of fill for packaged food products or other fluent materials are achieved by a method, which compares the actual weight-versus-time profile with a standard load curve.

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Product Fill Control Method

Accurate weights of fill for packaged food products or other fluent materials are achieved by a method, which compares the actual weight-versus-time profile with a standard load curve.

The food product or other package filling material is fed to the weigh bucket at a bulk feed rate, until the load signal from the scale reaches a bulk set point (BSP); then the feeding continues at a fine or dribble rate until the load signal reaches a fine set point (FSP), at Which time the feed is cut off. If the FSP is at the proper voltage level, the in-flight material that settles into the bucket after cutoff will bring the load signal up to a final value which corresponds to the desired net weight. A final weight reading is taken at this time, and if the product charge is below the minimum acceptable weight, sufficient additional product is dribbled in to attain proper weight before the contents of the bucket are discharged.

Based upon historical data for each scale, obtained over a number of past fill cycles, a standard weight-versus-time curve is constructed and maintained to show the average manner in which the load is expected to build up between BSP and FSP. The voltage difference between the BSP and FSP levels is divided by a convenient integer (e.g., 4), to establish a number of intermediate step levels. These will be numbered 0 through 4, for example, with "0" being the BSP level and "4" the FSP level. On the assumption that the load signal will be sampled at regular intervals, the system stores reference data to denote the number of signal samplings, otherwise known as "analog input" (A.I.) readings, that should occur as the load signal progresses from each step level to the next if the standard curve were being followed.

As each sample reading is taken, it is compared with the FSP value to determine whether or not cutoff should occur at that instant. As the load signal reaches each of the step levels between BSP and FSP, the number of sampling time intervals that elapsed since attainment of the preceding step level is compared with the number of inte...