Browse Prior Art Database

Time Sharing Key Entry Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079194D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Maher, JH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Two or more key stations share the same execution code but are independent as to I/O buffer storage. Under normal conditions, one station has control and processes key strokes. When it has completed the processing, control is given to the other station. If processing time becomes excessive, the station must go into a time-slice control sequence which stores return parameters and then allows another station to gain control. The station may go into a time-slice sequence more than once before processing is complete.

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Time Sharing Key Entry Device

Two or more key stations share the same execution code but are independent as to I/O buffer storage. Under normal conditions, one station has control and processes key strokes. When it has completed the processing, control is given to the other station. If processing time becomes excessive, the station must go into a time-slice control sequence which stores return parameters and then allows another station to gain control. The station may go into a time- slice sequence more than once before processing is complete.

In a two station configuration, power is supplied to the system and all components are reset to their initial state. The station one starts display update and its keyboard is reset, while station two is set "busy" with its return parameter set to initiate the display update function. At the completion of station one display update, station two is selected. As station two had been set busy during initialization, the control goes into a time-slice code wherein station two's display is updated with its keyboard reset, after which station one will again be selected. As it is not busy, any queued memory commands will be initiated and the control will test to see if a key stroke has taken place. If not, station two will be selected and go through the same steps. If a key stroke had been made, it will be translated and the control will test to see if the station is in a local wait code, for example, a situation that requires several consecutive key strokes prior to processing. If station one is not in a local wait code, the key stroke will be processed, its display updated and its keyboard reset. Station two will be then selected. If processing time is excessive, the station will be set busy with the proper return parameter set and the other station selected. If station one had bee...