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Directional Synchronism in Closed Circuit Television

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079222D
Original Publication Date: 1973-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ellsworth, RK: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In testing or movement of very small pieces such as semiconductor chips into position for probing, or to move the chip into a precise location relative to another element, closed-circuit television screens have proved to be exceptional aids.

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Directional Synchronism in Closed Circuit Television

In testing or movement of very small pieces such as semiconductor chips into position for probing, or to move the chip into a precise location relative to another element, closed-circuit television screens have proved to be exceptional aids.

The normal mode of projecting movement of an X-Y slide on the closed- circuit television screen is such that when the slide moves in the X direction, the picture on the television screen appears to move in the Y direction, and vice- versa. As may be imagined, this disassociation of orientation confuses the operator, and it is difficult and time-consuming for him to make the necessary corrections to move the slides into the desired direction, so as to displace the workpiece thereon accurately. A simple solution would be to orient the yoke of the television receiver 90 degrees, but the drive of the vertical is insufficient to fill the screen.

Accordingly, it was discovered that turning the yoke assembly in the television camera as opposed to the receiver, changes the direction and movement of the visual display on the receiver, so that movement in the X direction to the right (for example) illustrates a picture of an object in the X direction to the right. The same is also true for the Y direction, as well as theta adjustments.

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