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Hydrogen Fired Dielectric for Use in Gas Panel Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079297D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aboelfotoh, O: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Aging phenomena associated with untreated lead silicate dielectric glasses may be negated or materially reduced by exposing the surface of the dielectric material, after it has been flowed to the substrate, to a hydrogen or hydrogen/nitrogen atmosphere at moderate temperatures. This results in a lowering of the resistance in the surface layers of the dielectric material, preventing localized charge accumulations due to electron and ion bombardment. (Such charges lead to a change in Pbo/Pb/SiO(2) ratios and thus to the so-called aging phenomenon.) Improved secondary electron emission characteristics are also obtained.

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Hydrogen Fired Dielectric for Use in Gas Panel Displays

Aging phenomena associated with untreated lead silicate dielectric glasses may be negated or materially reduced by exposing the surface of the dielectric material, after it has been flowed to the substrate, to a hydrogen or hydrogen/nitrogen atmosphere at moderate temperatures. This results in a lowering of the resistance in the surface layers of the dielectric material, preventing localized charge accumulations due to electron and ion bombardment. (Such charges lead to a change in Pbo/Pb/SiO(2) ratios and thus to the so-called aging phenomenon.) Improved secondary electron emission characteristics are also obtained.

Additionally, the hydrogen atmosphere firing tightens the surface structure of the glass by reacting with the single bonded oxygen ions, producing a uniform glass surface.

Typically, substrates coated with fused lead silicate type dielectric materials are exposed to pure hydrogen (or atmospheres high in hydrogen content), at temperatures ranging from 250 degrees C to 300 degrees C for times varying from 10 to 30 minutes. Panels may then be assembled, sealed and filled with gas in a normal manner and tipped off.

Panels fabricated in this fashion (either low temperature or solder glass seal) have excellent discharge uniformity, quite wide memory margins, and are moderately stable during prolonged burn-in.

Alternatively, panels may be assembled in the usual fashion and exposed to hydrogen gas for t...