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Distributed Feedback Semiconductor Injection Laser

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079315D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, EP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A distributed feedback semiconductor injection laser and its method of fabrication are described. Operation of such a device is based on the fact that the feedback necessary for laser oscillation need not be provided by mirrors. It can also be provided by a grating structure, involving a periodic spatial variation of gain in the active medium. Distributed feedback has been incorporated previously into dye lasers, but not into semiconductor injection lasers. The achievement of distributed feedback semiconductor injection lasers is important in the field of integrated optics, as it simplifies the integration and coupling of the laser output to optical waveguides. A laser of the type discussed above is shown in cross section in Fig. 1A.

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Distributed Feedback Semiconductor Injection Laser

A distributed feedback semiconductor injection laser and its method of fabrication are described. Operation of such a device is based on the fact that the feedback necessary for laser oscillation need not be provided by mirrors. It can also be provided by a grating structure, involving a periodic spatial variation of gain in the active medium. Distributed feedback has been incorporated previously into dye lasers, but not into semiconductor injection lasers. The achievement of distributed feedback semiconductor injection lasers is important in the field of integrated optics, as it simplifies the integration and coupling of the laser output to optical waveguides. A laser of the type discussed above is shown in cross section in Fig. 1A.

The laser device shown in Fig. 1A consists of a substrate 1 of n conductivity types gallium arsenide, on which successive layers 2, 3 of n conductivity type gallium aluminum arsenide and lightly doped gallium arsenide, respectively, are formed by liquid phase epitaxial deposition, for example. Layers 4, 5 of p conductivity type gallium aluminum arsenide and p+ conductivity type gallium arsenide, respectively, are similarly deposited in succession on layer 3 by epitaxial deposition techniques. A metallic contact 6 to which a bias voltage 7 is applied is connected to layer 5, after proton bombardment forms high resistivity regions 8 which extend through layers 3, 4 and 5 into layer 2. Substrate 1 is grounded and layer 3 forms an optical waveguide from which laser radiatio...