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Initializations in Decision Tables

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079326D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sharman, GC: AUTHOR

Abstract

It has been shown that decision tables can be used to represent a tree structure of tests (IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 14, No. 12, May 1972, pages 3747 and 3748). When decision tables are used in conjunction with a high-level programming language, situations often occur where some action must be performed before a test can be made, or where some action is most conveniently performed between two tests in the tree. These actions are referred to as "initializations" They may be illustrated by a flow chart as shown in Fig. 1, in which two initializations are used.

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Initializations in Decision Tables

It has been shown that decision tables can be used to represent a tree structure of tests (IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 14, No. 12, May 1972, pages 3747 and 3748). When decision tables are used in conjunction with a high-level programming language, situations often occur where some action must be performed before a test can be made, or where some action is most conveniently performed between two tests in the tree. These actions are referred to as "initializations" They may be illustrated by a flow chart as shown in Fig. 1, in which two initializations are used.

The initialization is represented by an extra entry in the decision table. Since it always appears before a decision, it must appear at the head of the subtable containing that decision. In Fig. 2, one initialization is represented by an action entry in each column of the subtable. That this action is performed on every path through the subtable is indicated by making the entry in each column.

In Fig. 3, the complete decision table is shown with two initializations represented in this way. The first initialization is shown in each column of the major decision table, and the second initialization is shown in each column of the right-hand subtable only.

The action performed by the initialization entry must not break the sequential flow. It may represent an assignment or a subroutine call, but not a branch. A simple extension to the recursive algorithm previously...