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Introducing Nail Shaped Pins in a Pinning Jig

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079353D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lemoine, JM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A conventional way of attaching multilayer circuit structures to their supporting material, typically printed circuits, involves the use of nail-shaped pins, the head of Which are bonded to the back of the structure at desired recesses through deposited Pb-Sn solder pads. These pins allow the electrical connection of internal conductors and voltage planes with external circuitry.

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Introducing Nail Shaped Pins in a Pinning Jig

A conventional way of attaching multilayer circuit structures to their supporting material, typically printed circuits, involves the use of nail-shaped pins, the head of Which are bonded to the back of the structure at desired recesses through deposited Pb-Sn solder pads. These pins allow the electrical connection of internal conductors and voltage planes with external circuitry.

The attachment of nail-shaped pins to the structure is generally made by using an apertured jig filled with these pins, so that the heads remain exposed. After registration of both the structure and the jig to correctly align the solder coated recesses and corresponding heads, the resulting product is introduced in a furnace to properly attach the pins to the recesses. As shown in Figs. 1A and 1B, the equipment basically is comprised of a pinning jig 10, a cover 11 and a supporting plate 12.

Fig. 1A shows an exploded elevated view of the equipment, and Fig. 1B shows a cross section of the equipment according to Fig. 1 along line aa. The supporting plate 12 is connected through an aperture 13 to a vacuum source, not shown, while the cover is provided with two holes 14,15 where high pressure or compressed air is introduced.

The pinning jig 10 is made of carbon and is provided with a plurality of apertures 16 which must be filled by the nail-shaped pins 17. The vacuum draws the nail-shaped pins 17 appearing near the holes 16 into the holes 16, and maintains them in position. The compressed air injected into the cover 11 through apertures 14 and 15 provides a whirl, maintaining the pins in movement until they become fixed in a hole.

A restricted orifice 18 of a few tenths of...