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Vented Acoustic Panel for Electronic Enclosures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079385D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arent, GR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique for acoustically treating the bottom ventilating panel of electronic cabinets is provided. The design allows free passage of cooling air into (or out of) the enclosure, and meets the safety requirement for ignition through bottom panel openings.

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Vented Acoustic Panel for Electronic Enclosures

A technique for acoustically treating the bottom ventilating panel of electronic cabinets is provided. The design allows free passage of cooling air into (or out of) the enclosure, and meets the safety requirement for ignition through bottom panel openings.

The louvered panels for air passage located at the bottom of a machine can be treated with sound absorbing material, without cutting down the air flow appreciably or increasing the height very much. The construction has to be such that flaming oil, or molten PVC (polyvinyl chloride) and copper, dropped onto the panel will be impeded from passing through.

Strips of acoustical material 10 such as fiber glass or open pore foam, having a trapezoidal cross section are bonded to the top side of a slotted bottom plate 12, as shown in Fig. 1. The strips 10 are spaced to cover the slotted openings 14 in the plate 12, and overlap the adjacent acoustic strip slightly. The air flow pattern through the panel, and two typical constructions are shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 2(a) shows the strips 10 attached to a flange portion 16 of the louvered panel 12. It will be noted that the acoustical material 10 does not have to have a trapezoidal cross-sectional shape to operate in this application. Fig. 2(b) shows the trapezoidal shape of the sound absorbing material as well as the overlap which is required not only for sound absorption, but to prevent molten or flaming debris from passing th...