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Browse Prior Art Database

Liquid Crystal Cell Filling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079433D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edmonds, HD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Shown schematically is an apparatus for simultaneously filling a plurality of liquid crystal cells 1. These cells are supported on a vertically reciprocating jig 2 having sufficient vertical movement for immersing the bottom of cells 1 into liquid crystal material 3 disposed in a container 4, which is supported in a proper position on a pedestal 5.

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Liquid Crystal Cell Filling

Shown schematically is an apparatus for simultaneously filling a plurality of liquid crystal cells 1. These cells are supported on a vertically reciprocating jig 2 having sufficient vertical movement for immersing the bottom of cells 1 into liquid crystal material 3 disposed in a container 4, which is supported in a proper position on a pedestal 5.

The liquid crystal cells are of usual construction, being comprised of a pair of spaced transparent (e.g., glass) supports 6 having their innerfaces covered with transparent conductive electrodes 7 and sealed around their peripheral by suitable means, such as a glass frit shim 8.

The liquid crystal cell filling differs from conventional methods in that only a single hole 9 is utilized, which is surrounded on the outer surface of the glass support 6 with a soldered dam 10.

For filling, the liquid crystal cells 1 are mounted on jig 2 and enclosed within a bell jar 11 within which a vacuum is suitably pulled, whereupon the jig is lowered to immerse the lower end of the cell (having the opening 9) into the liquid crystal material 3. At this time the vacuum is removed and substituted with an ambient atmosphere, which results in the liquid crystal material being forced into the liquid crystal cells to accomplish the necessary filling thereof.

After filling, heat (such as a solder top or a small flame) is applied against the solder dam to reflow it and effect sealing of the hole in the glass suppor...