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Browse Prior Art Database

Temperature Detector for Integrated Circuit Chip

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079447D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Leininger, JC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In integrated circuit chips of large-scale integration wherein a great amount of heat is generated, and particularly in chips used in a liquid cooling environment, temperature sensing is critical in order that power may be removed, in the event that the temperature exceeds the limit tolerable by the circuits on the chip. In a liquid environment, such drastic changes in temperature may occur as a result of dissipation of the liquid coolant by a leak or other means, such as the coolant boiling off.

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Temperature Detector for Integrated Circuit Chip

In integrated circuit chips of large-scale integration wherein a great amount of heat is generated, and particularly in chips used in a liquid cooling environment, temperature sensing is critical in order that power may be removed, in the event that the temperature exceeds the limit tolerable by the circuits on the chip. In a liquid environment, such drastic changes in temperature may occur as a result of dissipation of the liquid coolant by a leak or other means, such as the coolant boiling off.

The circuit shown in Fig. 1 may be embodied directly into the integrated circuit chip, to provide such temperature sensing characteristics. The circuit has a V(OUT) vs Temperature characteristic shown in the graph of Fig. 2.

The temperature coefficients of diodes D1, D2 and D3 and transistor T1 are additive, and contribute to a heavy effect on I(C) as the temperature changes. R1 and R2 are above and below the base node with respect to potential and, therefore, compensate for the temperature and tolerance variations due to changes in their ohmic values. R4 gives some base-to-emitter feedback and keeps the emitter current confined to a well-controlled range.

A graphic analysis at temperatures of 35 degrees C., 60 degrees C., and 85 degrees C. is shown in the graph in Fig. 3. The resulting current variation dictates a 600 ohm collector resistor R3, to get the maximum dynamic voltage range for the corresponding temperature ran...