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Browse Prior Art Database

Variable Keyboard for Terminal Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079525D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cummings, TF: AUTHOR

Abstract

This apparatus relates to an inexpensive general-purpose display terminal keyboard, wherein some or all keys can be instantly and automatically relabeled depending on desired specific applications.

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Variable Keyboard for Terminal Displays

This apparatus relates to an inexpensive general-purpose display terminal keyboard, wherein some or all keys can be instantly and automatically relabeled depending on desired specific applications.

The concept involved is to take a portion of an existing terminal's display image and use it to automatically define unique labels for some or all keys, to provide a unique terminal keyboard for a given application. The labels are part of the display image and are placed in a relatively standard position, which can be changed according to each application.

The system is actuated by depressing clear plastic keys, through which the labels are viewed, and which are mounted over the face of a portion of the display.

Referring to the figure, 1, the elements of the terminal include an opaque mask 10 having openings much wider than the data to be displayed, in order to minimize the need for any alignment. The keys 12 are of clear plastic and could be lens shaped for magnification, if desired. An alignment target 14 is also provided consisting of clear plastic with a cross hair. Vertical and horizontal alignment knobs 16 and 18 are used to center the keys.

The display image for labeling the keys is part of each application. The display image could be part of each frame generated, or may derive from a buffer output from the terminal sending unit, or be initially put into a buffer at the terminal receiving unit and be subsequently generate...