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Method for Regenerating the NAD/+/ Coenzyme

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079526D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Studebaker, JF: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is known that enzymes can be advantageously applied to industrial and medical problems. Since they function as catalysts, their high cost can be spread over many reaction cycles in cases where they can be recovered easily at the end of each of such cycles.

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Method for Regenerating the NAD/+/ Coenzyme

It is known that enzymes can be advantageously applied to industrial and medical problems. Since they function as catalysts, their high cost can be spread over many reaction cycles in cases where they can be recovered easily at the end of each of such cycles.

Many oxidation-reduction enzymes require the coenzyme NAD/+/ as an electron acceptor. This requirement presents a problem in the application of such enzymes, since NAD/+/ is an expensive compound which must be isolated from a natural source. Since one molecule of coenzyme is consumed for each molecule of product, Substrate + NAD/+//enzyme/--> Product + NADH + H/+/ only those products which are more valuable than the coenzyme would be produced by the enzymatic method.

The present proposal alleviates this problem by using an inexpensive electron donor (such as ethanol, an alcohol) as the ultimate source of the electron. Another enzyme (such as alcohol dehydrogenase) is present in the reaction solution, to catalyze the transfer of the electron between the inexpensive compound and the coenzyme:
Alcohol + NAD/+//ADH/--> NADH + H/+/ + aldehyde Product NAD/+/ /enzyme/--> H/+/ + NADH substrate. The coenzyme is now a continually regenerated intermediate, and its cost may be spread over the many molecules of product produced per molecule of coenzyme.

The two enzymes involved in the process would be separated at the end of the reaction by the same means. For example, if they h...