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Browse Prior Art Database

Metal Oxide Semiconductor Electroluminescent Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079527D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fang, FF: AUTHOR

Abstract

A device has been provided that employs a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) unit, in conjunction-with an electron beam-carrying signal and an electric potential applied across the unit, for achieving both storage and display of analog as well as binary information.

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Metal Oxide Semiconductor Electroluminescent Device

A device has been provided that employs a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) unit, in conjunction-with an electron beam-carrying signal and an electric potential applied across the unit, for achieving both storage and display of analog as well as binary information.

As seen in Fig. 1, the three-element device is composed of a transparent metal electrode 2, an oxide layer 4 and a P-type semiconductor 6. Information is written into the device by applying a positive voltage from power source 8 across the device at the same time that an electron beam 20, modified by signal 22, is applied to transparent electrode 2. Generator 10 is a source of electrons, elements 16 and 18 are electron-accelerating and modulating means, respectively, and plates 12-12' and 14-14' are conventional x-y deflectors of electron beam 20. The P-type semiconductor 6 has its polarity inverted by the combined presence of positive voltage from source 8 and electron beam 20. The inverted polarity yields a visual output (see Fig. 2) when an AC voltage is applied to the device.

The information stored as an inverted polarity remains after the AC display bias shown in Fig. 2 has been removed. If new information is to be written into the MOS device, the old information is erased, as seen in Fig. 3, by applying a negative potential across the MOS device, at the same time that an electron beam 20 is made to dwell on the entire upper recording surface of el...