Browse Prior Art Database

Implementation of Integrated Workstation Capability Within an Operating System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079540D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bachofner, PM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Existing Remote Entry Subsystem (RES) technology on IBM System/360 or System/370 in 360 mode can be used as an intelligent workstation. This means that a user can make connection via LOGON from a remote location to the RES system, to allow the user to read jobs into the Host CPU for execution. The workstation programs in RES are stand-alone programs and do not allow concurrent processing in the workstation CPU.

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Implementation of Integrated Workstation Capability Within an Operating System

Existing Remote Entry Subsystem (RES) technology on IBM System/360 or System/370 in 360 mode can be used as an intelligent workstation. This means that a user can make connection via LOGON from a remote location to the RES system, to allow the user to read jobs into the Host CPU for execution. The workstation programs in RES are stand-alone programs and do not allow concurrent processing in the workstation CPU.

The Interchange Writer/Interchange Reader concept is an extension of workstation technology. Instead of reading data (JOBS) from card readers and in the process dedicating the workstation CPU to transmission of jobs and receipt of jobs output, the Interchange Writer reads jobs from the operating system central job queue (or job pool). It then connects to the teleprocessing (TP) access method to dial up the second RES (Host) system. Normal LOGON takes place to a normal Reader which accepts transmitted jobs as input and places it in the Host Systems job pool. When output becomes present, a normal writer transmits the output to an Interchange Reader which places this output into the job pool.

This mechanism can work both ways, i.e., a RES system, for example System I may have an Interchange Reader/Writer connected to System 2 (Host) making System 1 a workstation to System 2. Simultaneously, System 2 could have an Interchange Reader/Writer connected to System 1 (Host) making System...