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Predicting Power Needs During Peak Cooling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079541D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cormier, YJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In large industrial office facilities where great amounts of power are consumed, for maintaining normal indoor temperatures during peak cooling hours during the day in hot weather seasons, there is a need for predicting power requirements during such peak cooling hours. It is during these hours that power supply means will be taxed the most severely. In addition, where the power is supplied through utility companies, charges are based upon peak consumption. Therefore, it is desirable to maintain such peaks at as low a level as possible.

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Predicting Power Needs During Peak Cooling

In large industrial office facilities where great amounts of power are consumed, for maintaining normal indoor temperatures during peak cooling hours during the day in hot weather seasons, there is a need for predicting power requirements during such peak cooling hours. It is during these hours that power supply means will be taxed the most severely. In addition, where the power is supplied through utility companies, charges are based upon peak consumption. Therefore, it is desirable to maintain such peaks at as low a level as possible.

If the peak can be adequately predicted, other operations requiring power which are not essential to be performed during such peak power consumption hours may be shut off, slowed down or rescheduled to other times. However, a system for predicting such peaks is essential to such power utilization scheduling.

The present algorithm provides the basis for a system of power peak cooling requirements, which may be carried out on a sensor based computer. The example which will illustrate the algorithm is a typical hot summer day, and the facility is a typical industrial plant.

The algorithm, which will be hereinafter described in greater detail, gives an approximation of the maximum kilowatt utilization and cooling load for the day.

During normal operation, projection is made about every fifteen minutes up to six hours in advance of the anticipated peak. In effect, the algorithm is a three-point average straight line projection to a set time, and a continuation of projection as the arc of the circle to the peak time period. In a typical system, the projected data is printed every fifteen minutes on a computer output.

Then, when, for example, an additional chiller is required, the printout advises the operator to start an additional chiller. The result is that the minimum number of chillers is utilized to service the total facility cooling load for the day, without exceeding the kilowatt demand target. This kilowatt demand target may be the power consumption level which the facility cannot exceed without impairment of operations, or it may be, in the case where power is supplied by the utility company, the previous highest peak for the billing period which already has the cost and, therefore, is desirably not exceeded.

This algorithm can be used on any cyclic curve that varies more than 20% of its value per cycle. Another usage of this system is to predict the maximum heating power needed to heat a buildi...