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Machine Frame Construction Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079570D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kay, RC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A machine frame, such as one for a data terminal or entry unit, is constructed from thin gauge sheet metal where each element of the structure contributes to the structural strength of the whole, and the elements are arranged to form compartments for shielding electronic components mounted therewithin from acoustic, thermal and electromagnetic radiation. The machine frame is essentially formed as two enclosures abutting each other at a common face, with a common longitudinal member or backbone orthogonal to the common face. One of the two enclosures is formed so its centroid is not coaxial with the centroid of the other. This arrangement enhances the torsional strength of the machine frame. In addition, the elements have attachment flanges, whereby each element is self-locating with respect to the other elements.

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Machine Frame Construction Technique

A machine frame, such as one for a data terminal or entry unit, is constructed from thin gauge sheet metal where each element of the structure contributes to the structural strength of the whole, and the elements are arranged to form compartments for shielding electronic components mounted therewithin from acoustic, thermal and electromagnetic radiation. The machine frame is essentially formed as two enclosures abutting each other at a common face, with a common longitudinal member or backbone orthogonal to the common face. One of the two enclosures is formed so its centroid is not coaxial with the centroid of the other. This arrangement enhances the torsional strength of the machine frame. In addition, the elements have attachment flanges, whereby each element is self-locating with respect to the other elements. This reduces the requirements for assembly fixtures.

Fig. 1 is a simplified exploded view of the elements shown without the attachment and locating flanges. Element E forms the backbone and is common to the enclosures formed by elements A and F and by elements G and F seen in Figs. 2 and 3. Elements B and F join at a plane common to the enclosures.

Part of the element H extends the [ shape of backbone E. The structural section formed by element E and capped by elements A and F has a longer vertical web section than the section formed by element E and part of element H, when capped by elements F and G. By this arrangem...