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Impact Resistant High Density Polyurethanes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079574D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, DE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Impact strength is one of the most desirable properties to have in a polymeric material, but it is difficult to achieve without altering other physical properties such as tensile strength or heat deflection temperature. The present method not only incorporates rubbery materials into polyurethanes but also develops rubbery domains in situ, a most desirable form for these rubbery areas. By proper choice of rubbery materials or prepolymers, it is possible to develop synergistic effects and gain additional impact strength.

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Impact Resistant High Density Polyurethanes

Impact strength is one of the most desirable properties to have in a polymeric material, but it is difficult to achieve without altering other physical properties such as tensile strength or heat deflection temperature. The present method not only incorporates rubbery materials into polyurethanes but also develops rubbery domains in situ, a most desirable form for these rubbery areas. By proper choice of rubbery materials or prepolymers, it is possible to develop synergistic effects and gain additional impact strength.

The present approach has been to develop rubbery domains, that is, form tiny spheres of rubber in the polyurethane matrix. Thus when a test sample breaks, energy is dissipated by these rubbery regions. More energy is then required to break the part and thereby effectively have a tougher plastic. The additional energy-to-break, as observed on a stress-strain curve, is generally related to higher impact strength.

In these experiments, two functional polybutadienes were used in each sample. One material was soluble in the polyol prepolymer and the other was not, but both had functional groups that would react with isocyanates and tie into the polymer system. In certain formulations, these prepolymers alone gave little enhancement of impact strength, but when used together they showed synergistic effects and yielded high-impact strength products. The insoluble prepolymer cured in situ to form rubbery domains....