Browse Prior Art Database

Location of Crystallogaphic Defects in Semiconductor Materials by Infrared Inspection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079584D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berg, CA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The article "Copper Precipitation on Dislocations in Silicon", W. C. Dash, Journal of Applied Physics pp. 1193-1195, October 1956, describes a process for the determination of crystallographic defects in semiconductor crystals by diffusing copper into the crystals, followed by infrared observation. According to the article, the copper appears to precipitate in such dislocations, and the infrared observation detects the presence of copper, thereby giving the outlines of such dislocations.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 66% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Location of Crystallogaphic Defects in Semiconductor Materials by Infrared Inspection

The article "Copper Precipitation on Dislocations in Silicon", W. C. Dash, Journal of Applied Physics pp. 1193-1195, October 1956, describes a process for the determination of crystallographic defects in semiconductor crystals by diffusing copper into the crystals, followed by infrared observation. According to the article, the copper appears to precipitate in such dislocations, and the infrared observation detects the presence of copper, thereby giving the outlines of such dislocations.

It has been found that in the fabrication of conventional integrated circuits in silicon substrates, it is not necessary to diffuse copper in order to carry out the test described. If the semiconductor substrate is inspected using the infrared technique, at any point in the fabrication after a heat cycle in which wafers are cooled quickly, e.g., after the initial oxidation step of a silicon wafer, the infrared observation technique will reveal the presence of copper or other metals in the crystallographic defects.

It is believed that there is a sufficient amount of copper or related contaminants present in the ambient, to provide the indicators for such observation. These relatively small quantities appear to have been always inherently present in the semiconductor wafers and, therefore, appear to have no undesirable effect on the semiconductor structure being fabricated.

Accordingly, this test...