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Probe Analysis Technique for Semiconductor Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079588D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Curtis, HW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In this technique, a thin flexible foil is placed between a probe element and a semiconductor wafer. A more specific application of the technique is illustrated in Fig. 1 for determining semiconductor resistivity of a semiconductor body 10, by metal-insulator-semiconductor measurements. Ordinarily, such measurements are made on a semiconductor provided with an insulating layer. However, in this technique, the insulating layer can be provided in the form of aluminum foil 12 consisting of a central layer of aluminum 14 with an electrical contact 25, and having layers 16 of Al(2)O(3).

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Probe Analysis Technique for Semiconductor Testing

In this technique, a thin flexible foil is placed between a probe element and a semiconductor wafer. A more specific application of the technique is illustrated in Fig. 1 for determining semiconductor resistivity of a semiconductor body 10, by metal-insulator-semiconductor measurements. Ordinarily, such measurements are made on a semiconductor provided with an insulating layer. However, in this technique, the insulating layer can be provided in the form of aluminum foil 12 consisting of a central layer of aluminum 14 with an electrical contact 25, and having layers 16 of Al(2)O(3).

As indicated in Fig. 1, the foil 12 is forced into contact with the semiconductor body 10 by a deformable probe 20, preferably TEFLON*. The popular and well- known C-V technique for resistivity determination can then be made directly on the bare semiconductor surface. The probe arrangement eliminates the need to oxidize implanted or diffused semiconductor wafers for resistivity measurements.

As illustrated in Fig. 2, the general technique can also be used in connection with the metal-insulator-semiconductor characterization of flat-band voltage, mobile ion presence, fast surface states, insulator breakdown, gate leakage, and other tests commonly made by this well-known technique. In this application, an intimate metallic contact is required to be made to an insulating layer 22 on body
10. In conventional techniques, contact area reprod...