Browse Prior Art Database

Evaporated Film Monitor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079610D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lester, WC: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the system described by R. W. Kruppa et al on Pages 1056 and 1057 of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 13, No. 5, October 1970, deposition rates of evaporated film on a transparent film are monitored until such time as the film becomes nontransparent, whereupon the film is indexed to expose a clean area where the monitoring process is repeated.

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Evaporated Film Monitor

In the system described by R. W. Kruppa et al on Pages 1056 and 1057 of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 13, No. 5, October 1970, deposition rates of evaporated film on a transparent film are monitored until such time as the film becomes nontransparent, whereupon the film is indexed to expose a clean area where the monitoring process is repeated.

In the apparatus shown, a system has been developed to provide a continuous historical crosssection of a vacuum deposition operation. In this manner, a historical sample can be analyzed for postdeposition studies of composition effects, and phasing between the evaporant materials. Also real- time monitoring of the deposition rate can be readily achieved using optical transmission or electrical system measurements.

As shown in the drawings, (e.g., Figs. 1, 2 and 3) a strip of 0.5 mil of polyimide film, i.e. KAPTON*) is removed from a supply spool 2. The removed film 1 is then continuously passed over an evaporant aperture 3 for exposure to a metallizing atmosphere, which results in deposition of a metal on film 1 so as to result in a continuous strip of deposited evaporant. The metallized film is then wound and stored on a driven constant-speed rewind spool 4. Alignment of the film can be maintained by conventional guide idlers 5 and 6, with tension maintained on the film through a mechanical brake on the film supply spool 2. In the preferred form, the rewind spool 4 is designed with a r...