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Reaming and Plugging Ink Jet Nozzles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079677D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Leslie, GG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

When utilizing ink streams for printing purposes in known ink jet apparatuses, it is required to shut-off the ink stream during the nonprinting periods which can vary from minutes to hours to days. During this interval, it has been found that stream stability can suffer after the nozzle assembly producing the ink stream has been turned off for some time. This is believed to be due to the settling of any pigment particles on the internal surfaces of the nozzle assembly.

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Reaming and Plugging Ink Jet Nozzles

When utilizing ink streams for printing purposes in known ink jet apparatuses, it is required to shut-off the ink stream during the nonprinting periods which can vary from minutes to hours to days. During this interval, it has been found that stream stability can suffer after the nozzle assembly producing the ink stream has been turned off for some time. This is believed to be due to the settling of any pigment particles on the internal surfaces of the nozzle assembly.

The shown nozzle reaming and cleaning device is an apparatus capable of alleviating such problems. The assembly includes the nozzle body 10 having an actual jet orifice in the member 12 located in the forward end thereof. An ink inlet 14 is provided as well as a flushing or cleaning port 16. The actual cleaning device includes a movable shaft 18 having an 0-ring seal at 22, which allows the shaft to be moved axially within the nozzle body. At the forward end of the shaft 18 is a portion 2O having substantially the same diameter as the opening in the nozzle 12. Section 24 indicates the small particles of stainless steel, brass or an equivalent to aid in the reaming of the nozzle. Additionally, shown are a plurality of bristles 21 which move back and forth within the main nozzle chamber to stir up any sediment or sludge, so that it may be removed during the flushing cycle.

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