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Browse Prior Art Database

Potentiometric Method of Quantizing Solderability

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079711D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frate, MA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Solderability is defined as the condition of a metallic surface ready to be soldered. Presently, there are no known methods of determining when a surface is adequately prepared for soldering. Also, there is no quantitative method of determining what effect a flux has on a surface as a preparation for soldering. An apparatus and procedure have been developed to permit the determination of when a surface is most solderable, and what effect various fluxes have on different surfaces.

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Potentiometric Method of Quantizing Solderability

Solderability is defined as the condition of a metallic surface ready to be soldered. Presently, there are no known methods of determining when a surface is adequately prepared for soldering. Also, there is no quantitative method of determining what effect a flux has on a surface as a preparation for soldering. An apparatus and procedure have been developed to permit the determination of when a surface is most solderable, and what effect various fluxes have on different surfaces.

The apparatus comprises a container 10 in which a solder 11 such as SnBi and a flux 12 such as glycerol + tartaric acid + HCl are placed. A platinum reference electrode 13 and a sample element 14 are suspended in the flux 12 and interconnected by a voltmeter 15. The potential is measured between the platinum reference electrode 13 and the sample element 14. The data is recorded on a strip chart as potential vs. time. The actual millivolt reading is different for each system, i.e., the material being tested, the reference electrodes, and the flux material.

The initial slope of the curve (Fig. 2) is indicative of how ready a surface is to be soldered. A large slope indicates that the surface is ready for soldering, while a small slope indicates that the surface is being cleaned and readied for soldering. A broad, small slope indicates a dirty copper surface which is not solderable, and may take several minutes or hours to reach a maximum soldering condition. I...