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Injection Luminescent Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079858D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Di Stefano, TH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Certain polycrystalline thin films can be made to give off light when they are bombarded by electrons of relatively low energy. Among these materials are Ga(x)Al(1-x) As, ZnSe, GdSe etc. If the material is "p"-type, the luminescence can be produced by the injection of relatively low-energy electrons. A thin film light-emitting device may be made, by injecting hot electrons with 1 to 5 eV of energy into thin films of such luminescent material where large area display devices may be fabricated, without the necessity of using either single crystals or semiconducting junctions.

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Injection Luminescent Device

Certain polycrystalline thin films can be made to give off light when they are bombarded by electrons of relatively low energy. Among these materials are Ga(x)Al(1-x) As, ZnSe, GdSe etc. If the material is "p"-type, the luminescence can be produced by the injection of relatively low-energy electrons. A thin film light-emitting device may be made, by injecting hot electrons with 1 to 5 eV of energy into thin films of such luminescent material where large area display devices may be fabricated, without the necessity of using either single crystals or semiconducting junctions.

The concept presented here is a means for injecting electrons into a luminescent thin film. A representative structure is illustrated. Here, hot electrons are injected from a conducting or semiconducting substrate into an insulating layer. Large injection currents can be produced at relatively low-electric fields, if the contact barrier at the insulator interface is low. This contact barrier can be made small by any of several techniques: the interface between the insulator and the substrate can be covered with an alkali ion such as sodium: the interface can comprise a "dielectric diode" such as Nb:Nb(2)O(5): SiO(2) or Ta:Ta(2)O(5):SiO(2): and the interface can be formed by the anodization of a value metal such as Al(3)Ta(3)Nb(3) pr V. In any case, the electronic currents which are injected are large enough to excite a luminescent thin film.

The injected current is...