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Ink Jet Copier Nozzle Array

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079874D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 115K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fowler, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Various multiple nozzle configurations are described using deflection to form a raster with one set of common deflection plates.

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Ink Jet Copier Nozzle Array

Various multiple nozzle configurations are described using deflection to form a raster with one set of common deflection plates.

In an ink jet copier, there are many ways to get ink drops on the page. If 100,000 drops/second emit from the nozzles and no deflection is required, except for the unwanted drops, the paper speed is very fast at 416 in/second for 240 drops/inch using every drop. To slow it down, deflecting drops to the page in a raster or not using every drop are the only alternatives. If deflecting the drops is used, a configuration using one set of deflection plates for all of the nozzles in the array would be the simplest.

One configuration makes use of a printer head such as that shown in Figs. 1a and 1b. This head typically has 20 orifices (only a few shown) and one pair of deflection plates. It is tipped from the vertical by 3.576 degrees, as in Fig. 2a. The configuration minimizes drop placement "bookkeeping" and does not require an individual charge electrode voltage pedestal adjustment.

Staticly, each orifice can print a 20-drop raster starting at A, ending at B (Fig. 2a) on 0.003333 inch centers. The remaining parameter is the relative motion between the head and the paper. The head (or paper) is moved such that the 20-drop raster on the paper is a horizontal row of drops on 1/240 (0.004167) inch centers.

Saying this another way, in 20 drop times, the head must move horizontally (left to right) such that the 0.003333 inch is increased to 0.004167 inch and vertically down one drop space (0.004167 inch). For this example, the horizontal velocity is 83.333 in/sec and the vertical velocity is 20.833 inches/second. The resulting drop pattern on the page is shown in Fig. 3. Another example would...