Browse Prior Art Database

Vane Pump

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079878D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Siemer, GE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The intake and exhaust ports of a conventional vane pump are modified to eliminate "popping" noises associated therewith.

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Vane Pump

The intake and exhaust ports of a conventional vane pump are modified to eliminate "popping" noises associated therewith.

Fig. 1 depicts a typical vane pump and Fig. 2 depicts the pressure cycles for the pumped gas in each chamber. When the trailing vane A covers intake port 11, the pressure of chamber AB is as depicted at point 1 of Fig. 2. Further rotation decreases the chamber volume and the gas is compressed increasing its pressure, as noted between points 2 and 3. At point 3, the leading vane uncovers the exhaust port 13 and the entrapped gas rushes out to stabilize the chamber pressure at the tank pressure located at the outlet. Between points 3 and 4, the chamber volume is further reduced by rotation and more gas is delivered to the tank at tank pressure. At point 4, the trailing vane closes the exhaust port and the chamber's volume increases and the trapped gas expands, until point 5 is reached where the leading vane uncovers intake port 11. At this point, gas rushes out of the chamber until the pressure stabilizes at intake pressure. The pressure differences created at points 3 and 5 create a "popping" noise.

By modifying the intake and exhaust ports as depicted in Fig. 3, "popping" noise is eliminated. Exhaust port 15 is located so that it is uncovered just as chamber pressure reaches tank pressure. From points 2 to 3 of Fig. 4, the chamber continues to reduce in volume, delivering gas at constant pressure to the tank. At point 3, the trailing...