Browse Prior Art Database

Depositing Silicon and Silicon Compounds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079899D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chappelow, RE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Silicon is deposited by pyrolytically decomposing SiH(4) in a gaseous mixture of H2 and an inert gas, such as N2. Variation of the relative volumes of H2-inert gas provides precise control of uniformity, etching and doping characteristics. Si(3)N(4) can also be deposited in like manner by adding NH(3) to the gaseous mixture. It has been established that in depositing silicon, there is a unique ratio of H(2) - N(2) which yields the best possible layer uniformity in a given system. This value is geometry and temperature dependent, so that the optimum ratio is shifted by reconfiguring the system.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Depositing Silicon and Silicon Compounds

Silicon is deposited by pyrolytically decomposing SiH(4) in a gaseous mixture of H2 and an inert gas, such as N2. Variation of the relative volumes of H2-inert gas provides precise control of uniformity, etching and doping characteristics. Si(3)N(4) can also be deposited in like manner by adding NH(3) to the gaseous mixture. It has been established that in depositing silicon, there is a unique ratio of H(2) - N(2) which yields the best possible layer uniformity in a given system. This value is geometry and temperature dependent, so that the optimum ratio is shifted by reconfiguring the system.

The figure illustrates the percentage of H(2) in the H(2)-N(2) carrier, to assure optimum uniformity of a silicon layer as a function of the deposition temperature in a barrel reactor. For a practical system, the deposition temperatures are between 750 degrees C to 950 degrees C. As the deposition temperature is increased, the percentage of hydrogen required for the best uniformity increases in an exponential fashion.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]