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Fixture to Hold Printed Circuit during Electroless Plating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079917D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This scissor-like fixture provides a stable platform for a printed-circuit board during electroless plating, and allows removal of the plated board without danger of accidentally opening the fixture during handling.

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Fixture to Hold Printed Circuit during Electroless Plating

This scissor-like fixture provides a stable platform for a printed-circuit board during electroless plating, and allows removal of the plated board without danger of accidentally opening the fixture during handling.

The fixture consists of three spaced arms 10, 11 and 12 which are pivoted at
13. These arms are made of an inert material such as polyvinylchloride. At the pivot point 13 the arms are separated by relatively wide washers 14 and 15. These washers serve the purpose of placing the lower ends 16, 17 and 18 of the arms in a spaced triangular relationship. This relationship allows the fixture to be placed in a plating bath, with the triangle establishing a flat stable platform for the article being plated.

The upper ends 19 and 20 of the two outer arms, and the upper end 21 of the inner arm, are biased together by a spring or rubber band. This bias force holds the article in the fixture. In addition, this arrangement insures that the fixture can be hand held, either above or below pivot 13, without accidentally opening the fixture, since a force applied at either point tends to increase the fixture's closing force.

The lower ends 16, 17 and 18 of the arms are notched at a position significantly spaced from the ends of the arms. In this manner, the article being plated is always supported above the bottom of the plating tank, independent of the width of the article.

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