Browse Prior Art Database

Sheet Stacking Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079933D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wicklund, HP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Large sheets are difficult to feed or "push" into pockets or a stacking position, because they tend to roll or curl. Smaller sheets can be "cupped" in the direction of travel to increase rigidity in the "push" direction. This is not practical for large sheets because slippage on the feeding means is required. Further, a second problem of the sheet hitting the back of the pocket and bouncing into the feed path is also present.

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Sheet Stacking Method

Large sheets are difficult to feed or "push" into pockets or a stacking position, because they tend to roll or curl. Smaller sheets can be "cupped" in the direction of travel to increase rigidity in the "push" direction. This is not practical for large sheets because slippage on the feeding means is required. Further, a second problem of the sheet hitting the back of the pocket and bouncing into the feed path is also present.

These problems are solved by the apparatus shown in the drawing. Referring to the drawing, the pocket has a flange 1 turned under, as shown, to give nominal support to the edge 3. The other edge 5, not being similarly supported, droops downward thereby creating a cupping of the sheet along the diagonal 7. This gives the sheet a structural form of sufficient rigidity or stiffness, to permit the drive roll to push the sheet completely into the pocket without the sheet tending to curl or roll up, as would be the case without flange 1.

The leading corner 9 of the sheet, entering the angle pocket, will hit the pocket backstop ahead of the rest of the leading edge of the sheet, thereby distributing the energy of stopping over a longer period of time, as would be the case if the entire leading edge simultaneously impacted against the stop. The leading corner will, of course, bend the leading edge as it hits the stop. The result of this absorption of energy is that the sheet does not rebound into the throat area, which would re...