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High Level Language to Machine Level Language Correlation Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000079965D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brooks, AP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Introduction. It is often helpful in debugging programs to do so as close to the logic level of the program as possible. In order to facilitate this for programs written in a higher level language (HLL), a technique has been developed to correlate the high-level language, and the IBM S/360 Assembler language listings, and put the latter's hexadecimal location offsets onto each respective statement. These location values correspond to the hex offsets from-the beginning of the program. The programmer may then use this modified high-level language listing (with TSO TEST, e.g., or other debugging packages), to more easily debug the logic of his program.

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High Level Language to Machine Level Language Correlation Technique

Introduction.

It is often helpful in debugging programs to do so as close to the logic level of the program as possible. In order to facilitate this for programs written in a higher level language (HLL), a technique has been developed to correlate the high-level language, and the IBM S/360 Assembler language listings, and put the latter's hexadecimal location offsets onto each respective statement. These location values correspond to the hex offsets from-the beginning of the program. The programmer may then use this modified high-level language listing (with TSO TEST, e.g., or other debugging packages), to more easily debug the logic of his program. Methodology.

The feature is dependent upon the fact that statement numbers of the high- level language become a part of the annotated input to the Assembler. That is, each HLL statement must have a unique statement number generated for it, which must then appear as a part of the input generated for the Assembler for that statement. These statement numbers should progress in a predictable manner, such as increasing by 1. A particular language's compiler may, for example, place an asterisk in column 1 and the statement number in the last columns of each of its statements, and present this "comment card" to the assembler preceding the other assembler statements generated. The Correlate Feature may now scan both the high level language listing and the assembler listing produced, and correlate the two. For each (next) statement number found in the output of the higher level language listing, the assembler output is searched for the matching value which was passed to it. Once it is found, each next assembler output line is searched for a location value as long as another statement number is not encountered first. When found, this location value is copied onto the associated HLL statement output line, producing the modified output. This process is continued until the input is exhausted. Considerations.

If the HLL compiler being considered does any "bunching" of generated code, the degree of subsequent correlation will be reduced accordingly. For example, if the compiler produces all DECLAREd statements with their statement numbers contiguously, and then follows all of these with their respective assembler DS and DC statements, only the last such stat...